about apagie musha

if you head due east out of kigali, you’ll shortly come to a little sign that reads ‘musha’ and points up a dirt road to the north. and by up i mean really up. not many cars go up this road. instead you see women with baskets on their heads, young men pushing bicycles loaded with food from the market or jerry cans full of water, all heaving up the steep terrain a mile to musha.

at the top of the hill there’s a crossroads. on one corner is a church, another a little booth selling candy and soap, and on a third there’s a mud hut with a sign reading ‘hair salon’. turn left here, and you’ll pass a couple more hair salon huts, a handful of houses, some of which function as shops selling green bananas, potatoes, tomatoes, whatever happens to be in season, then there’s a few local bars, and then the school.

g.s. apagie musha straddles the dirt road through town. on one side are the administrative offices and teacher’s room, the library, several classrooms, the girls’ dormitory and refectory. on the other side are the upper level classrooms, boys’ dormitory and teachers’ houses. there’s also a refectory and kitchen, a water pump, a volleyball net, and two basketball hoops that pass for a court. they’ve got a building with laboratory tables but no equipment, that’s being used as a mosque for the muslim students. there’s another building with ten or fifteen working computers that is the ICT classroom but doubles as storage for the minimal sports equipment and jerseys.  

the classrooms themselves each have a blackboard and the students sit on benches, two to a desk.  the average class has about 50 students, with the largest at 56 and smallest 37.  there are 26 teachers, some of whom live in musha and others commute from nearby towns.  the students get no textbooks, no photocopies or handouts.  there is a library with a handful of dictionaries, copies of old national exams, and some assorted textbooks for use by the teachers.  the library is almost always locked.

this blog is contains stories of my life and work as an english teacher here in musha.  i’m a vso volunteer and i live with another volunteer called amanda furst, a biology teacher from winnipeg in canada.  enjoy your read and feel free to comment!

happy graduation school the corner store

doing laundry at the boys’ dorm at the rapsida performance hero’s day 3

the players the senior six team bananas


9 Responses to “about apagie musha”

  1. Alicia, I came across your blog through some kind of tag referral system, and it’s great. I’m in Rwanda, too, though living the (comparative) high life in Kigali. I’m also a journalist, and I’m interested in what you’re doing with VSO, and with the Kivu Writers. Is there some way we might be able to meet? I’d love to come out to see Musha…

    you can drop me an email at myname at gmail dot com. last name is moore. no dot or anything in between the two names.

  2. I´M SATISFY WITH YOUR WEB AND YOU ARE TERRIBLE I DON´T THAT IT´S YOUR MISSION HERE IN RWANDA BUT IS VERY GOOD YOU ARE GOOD RESEARCH BUT YOU WOULD SHOW SOME WAY TO ARRIVE IN THAT IF WE ARE POVERTY BUT NOT FAR

  3. YOU DONT ANSWER US ON NIZERIC@GMAIL.COM YOUR NEWS WHERE YOU ARE NOW THEN WE LOVE YOU FOREVER

  4. I’m very happy for all activities that you had done in RWANDA
    especially to teacher in APAGIE-MUSHA.I remember when you are
    in class, you had tough us English,ICT and business communication .
    I’think you for those activities.If it is possible can you sende
    me some pictures of six account 2007 in my email(ntawi.dieu@yahoo.fr)

    see you later.
    NTAWINIGA.Dieudonne.

  5. It is a good feeling to hear somebody talking about your school, your place you love and remember all your life! i was born in Gikoro,i use to go to callect water at musha and APAGIE was my secondary school,that school was funded by ower parents,because at the time we wouldn’t get a chance to go to the Gorvenment school Especially Titsis and some hutus because it was about your ethnic or the where you came from,well 1994 i was in last year and after genocide i went to finish my studies at Save Butare. Please keep your good job that school is ower parents regacy it means alot to us, and thank for this i am very pleased to hear about my place and my school, if you have any quetion to ask me about the school i will be happy to help.

    Rosette Uwangabe
    Chesterton
    Newcastle-under-Lyme
    Staffs
    ST5 7LL
    U.K

  6. hi!I think you for your favourable response about the pictures.
    think you.

  7. thank you very much!!!!

  8. Hello,is francoise 6th account inAPAGIE 2008.Ithink you for what was done for me especiary to pay schoolfees.my parents their great you.i’m OK .
    see you later.

  9. You work is so great I once lived near by that place for around six year, but once again you have made me feel like I am in Rwanda due to the way you have elaborated the real situation that prevail at the particular area. Actually when I was reading your article it was as if am in Rwanda. By Khalfan othuman nzaramba from the institute of rural development planning Dodoma Tanzania by now I am pursuing my bachelor in rural DVT planning.

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